I’m Kit Welchlin

http://www.mnsales.com — No I am not. If you know Kit, you know I’m not him, and if you know me, you know I’m not Kit.

Every person is different, and no matter how hard I try to be like Kit, I can only be me. But Kit and I do follow the same process when getting hired and have the same goal, afterwards – to deliver results.

My point is every person is different with their own style, but we can all follow the same sales process.

Every salesperson can follow the same process when selling. However, each person has their own style and flare. I can never change a person’s style – they say; “Hey man, that’s the way I roll,” but we can all work together to improve the sales process, techniques, behaviors and uncover our own self-limiting beliefs.

When everyone follows the same sales process, and new salespeople are hired, the process can be duplicated – making it easier to predict and manage the sales team and revenue expectations.

Now that you know me, I encourage you to meet Kit (https://welchlin.com/).

Scott Plum
Minnesota Sales Institute
http://www.mnsales.com
(612) 789-5700

Get in the Door Podcast with Steve Kloyda and Professor Plum – Episode #303

SHOW NOTES:

This week the “Professor” and I tackle Chapter 3 from, Letters From A Self-Made Merchant To His Son by George Horace Lorimer. The book is a classic.  [Read more…]

What’s A Perfect Week Look Like?

When I interview salespeople, whether they are an existing employee, or a candidate for a sales position, one of my most resourceful questions is, What’s a perfect week look like for you in your current role?

Often they will tell me “it depends.” This tells me how much of their time they are being proactive or reactive – letting other people determine how they spend their time.

Please tell me what’s going to happen – verses what happened. There is a big difference between being a customer service representative and reporting what happened, or a professional sales representative and promising what’s going to happen.

A prefect week should include a specific goal of meeting new prospects, follow-up calls to existing prospects in the pipeline, a number of discovery appointments and presentations, a sales revenue and order amounts, AND referrals actively requested and passively received, just to list a few.

All of these benchmarks and measurable activities will have a direct determination on the results. Once this process has been defined and implemented, it can be managed and improved.

No process? That’s when they share what happened.

Scott Plum
(612) 789-5700

I Was Wrong!

Last week someone came up to me at a networking event and introduction themselves and shared they first heard me present at a chamber event in 2002. I asked them what they remember from that talk, because I may have to walk some of my advice back.

Our market changes everyday and sometimes the advice I gave, is no longer true.

One example is the SMART goals. We’ve all heard them…Specific Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Time Bound. I was introduced to some real flaws to that program from a Harvard Business Review publication.

I learned people set low goals to make sure they Attainable and Realistic. Really? I thought. And more about it and was convinced it was true.

Another is: People buy from people they know, like and trust. What’s missing is people buy from others they Respect. The goal is to earn their respect and not have a goal to seek their approval.

Last one is, I hope they won’t ask. Bring it up! If YOU bring up an objection before they do, and they knock it down, there a lesser chance they will bring it up again.

Bring up a price range, ask above the people involved in making the decision, ask about the buying process. Really know what process it going to be followed for a prospect to be a client.

Asterisk: this advice may change in the future too. Call me if you’d like to talk about how your sales results have been altered over the years.

Scott Plum
http://www.mnsales.com
(612) 789-5700

Get in the Door Podcast with Steve Kloyda and Professor Plum – Episode #302

SHOW NOTES:

This week the “Professor” and I tackle Chapter 2 from, Letters From A Self-Made Merchant To His Son by George Horace Lorimer. The book is a classic.  [Read more…]

Get in the Door Podcast with Steve Kloyda and Professor Plum – Episode #301

SHOW NOTES:

This week the “Professor” and I tackle Chapter 1 from, Letters From A Self-Made Merchant To His Son by George Horace Lorimer. The book is a classic. [Read more…]

Stop Helping People!

But that’s how I describe what I do! I help people. Stop it!

When you help people. It’s like you’re up here and their down there. “Here, let me save you, you need to be rescued.” As if to say, “hey moron, you’re doing it wrong.” Ever help someone that is not as committed in solving a problem as you are? That only leads to frustration for us, right? [Read more…]

I Can Save You Money!

Ever have that salesperson call on you.  How do they know!  They don’t know anything about me.  How much I’m spending, why I’m spending it there, what else I’m buying, etc.

It’s insulting to tell someone you can save them money, without knowing any information.

What turns people off the most is assumptive salespeople.  These are the salespeople that assume everyone wants their product; and everyone has a problem, and everyone wants to change.  It simply is not true. Don’t assume.  Ask. [Read more…]

Get in the Door Podcast with Steve Kloyda and Professsor Plum – Episode #300

SHOW NOTES:

We are BACK. We took a month off to get rejuvenated. We are ready for a new show. This week the Professor and I have very casual conversation about sales. We shared many tactics and strategies and sales secrets. By the way, this is episode #300. What a major milestone. [Read more…]

You’re Not Being Tested

He walked into my office and sat down.  I asked him, “How you doing since our last session?”  He replied with, “I’m still struggling with confidence.  I wish I saw me how others see me.  I want to earn their (prospects) respect and when they come into the store, I want them to value working with me.  I want to offer them value, so they’ll buy from me.”

I asked him, “What do you think would be of value for them?”  He answered with, “The benefits of the machine.  What it can do.  To show them I know what I’m talking about.”

He obviously had been through the standard, new hire sales training program that emphasis’ features and benefits, with a summary test on product knowledge before releasing them into the wild.  This traditional onboarding program gives him great frustration, because he is not making his numbers and the month is closing in 12 days. [Read more…]